Calling In Cows

cohunter14

Administrator
Jul 10, 2017
5,244
Unfortunately I had only a cow tag this year for my archery hunt. At one point, I was easily inside of 100 yards of a couple of cows, but it was fairly thick and I couldn't see them. I called and they initially were calling back, but then disappeared never to be heard from again. I know my wind is good and I also never heard them blow out of there. My question is this: in a scenario like that, how do you get the cows to come to you? Anyone ever have any luck in that situation?
 

Ol Arky

New member
Aug 5, 2017
395
Too the best of my aging memory there's a lost calf that someone told me about....

If that's true you might try that....
 

cnelk

New member
Mar 23, 2017
5,542
Derek


Ive found it very hard to call elk back to area they have once been. Maybe a stupid raghorn will do it on occasion, but not very often.




If you know where they tend to bed up, get close and give a fews mews. Sit back and wait... those cows love company



http://youtu.be/oXWB6-l_nX4
 

cohunter14

Administrator
Jul 10, 2017
5,244
Thanks Brad! I hadn't scared them out or anything, they just responded to my cow calls. I just wasn't ever able to get them to come in or catch a glimpse at them unfortunately.
 

cohunter14

Administrator
Jul 10, 2017
5,244
trophyhill said:
I've called in a bunch of cows using the blind cold calling scenario.


In that scenario are you just making cow calls or mixing in bugles as well?
 

WW

New member
Mar 3, 2014
1,397
Trophy hill pretty much nailed it. I have called in many cows using the blind calling or silent calling sequence.

Elk are herd animals. So if you find one that is by itself, they are fairly easy to call in as they are looking for companionship. Spikes that are separated from the herd are suckers for this type of calling as well.

If you can find Jim Horns DVD on silent calling and try it, you will do well.
 

cohunter14

Administrator
Jul 10, 2017
5,244
So are these blind calling or silent calling sequences too complex to explain on a forum?
 

WW

New member
Mar 3, 2014
1,397
No, not really unless you are a two finger search and destroy typer like me. I recommend the DVD I mentioned from Jim Horn. He goes into detail. If you can't find it, ask Rockie Jacobsen (Corey's Dad). He and Jim used to be good friends.
 

cohunter14

Administrator
Jul 10, 2017
5,244
Bill, I actually found an old post of yours that details this. Here's a link for those that are interested:


https://www.elk101.com/forums/index.php/topic,4509.0.html
 

cnelk

New member
Mar 23, 2017
5,542
Ive found it good to have 3-4 different style open reed cow calls and use them all. Make it sound like a party.


Keep the wind in your face, set up and cold call every 300-400yds. Call 15-20 mins and move. Id rather cover more ground than sit and wait as my target elk are the close ones.
 

dynamike33

New member
Nov 26, 2014
4
Nothing wrong with a cow tag, my first 3 elk tags were cow tags and I've killed a few on either sex tags as well, any elk is a trophy to me! I've called them in using a cow call, high pitch calf whines and mews, often a cow will come to investigate the calf in distress or lost. I've even had them come in during a bull set-up.
 

nclonghunter

New member
Dec 28, 2012
681
Just an observation from the last couple years. When a bull gets on a cow in heat and she has a calf, the calf will get booted out of the herd or the calf may not be able to keep up with its mom getting chased by a bull and was left behind. Either way they will make a repeated and loud call while moving through the woods. They are desperate to get back in the herd and find mamma. Learn that calf call/sound and you can bring in cows. Plus it's a good bet that a bull is in the area chasing a hot cow if you locate a calf running by itself calling.
One call I use to mimic the sound is the "Elk Reel". It's also a good call to mix in with adult cow sounds.
 

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